NEWS BLOG

Famous mahseer finally named

Famous mahseer finally named

Although the survival of the River Cauvery’s famous hump-backed mahseer is still in serious doubt, the publication today of a new scientific paper (Resolving the taxonomic enigma of the iconic game fish, the hump-backed mahseer from the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, India) makes a giant leap towards saving it

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From the roof of the world

From the roof of the world

During another busy schedule for World Fish Migration Day, Mahseer Trust Education and Outreach Officer, Steve Lockett visited Kathmandu in Nepal. Over the course of a weekend, there were three events at National Trust for Nature Conservation’s Central Zoo. These...

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MT’s Adrian Pinder and Andy Harrison visit Madhya Pradesh Forest Department hatchery on the Narmada River

MT’s Adrian Pinder and Andy Harrison visit Madhya Pradesh Forest Department hatchery on the Narmada River

As part of a multi-faceted trip, encompassing four Indian states over a two week period, Mahseer Trust’s Adrian Pinder and Andy Harrison visited the Madhya Pradesh Forest Department hatchery on the Narmada River in a bid to resolve the taxonomy of the endemic mahseer species found within the Narmada catchment and widespread throughout central India.

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Make mahseer pay

Make mahseer pay

Ecotourism has long been identified as a route to secure local buy-in to a conservation ethos. In the main, this has meant using catch-and-release angling as the specific money spinner. However, a different approach has been in play for the last 10 or more years in the wilds of Borneo; or just outside the small hill town of Ranau, at any rate.

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Garo Hills fish kills

Garo Hills fish kills

Shocking photos of a devastating mahseer harvest from the beautiful Garo Hills of Meghalaya state in the far northeast of India gave rise to anger among both locals and the angling community on social media recently. While there is no absolute confirmation of the method of killing the huge numbers of Tor putitora and Neolissochilus hexagonolepis, the source of the photos suggested that either dynamite or poison was used to deliver the fish to waiting nets.

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MT helping schoolkids learn the importance of natural river processes

MT helping schoolkids learn the importance of natural river processes

As part of #kaverimission, Mahseer Trust Officer for Education and Outreach – Steve Lockett, Trustee (India Regional Lead) – Derek D’Souza and volunteer – Claire Pinder have been engaging with young people in a variety of locations, demonstrating the importance of natural river processes using our interactive Emriver modelling table.

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